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Every child develops differently. Parents are the first to know if their child needs a helping hand. If you have any questions or concerns please call Sprout to speak with a Developmental Specialist.

Developmental Milestones

  • Make eye contact
  • Follow moving objects with eyes
  • Seem surprised by loud noises
  • Turn head to inspect surroundings
  • Make cooing sounds like “ooh” or “aah”
  • Lift head and chest while lying on tummy
  • Recognize familiar faces
  • Turn head towards sounds
  • Laugh
  • Look for fallen objects
  • Transfer toys from hand to hand
  • Roll from back to tummy
  • Understand/respond to simple questions
  • Use more than 50 words
  • Put two words together like “more nice”
  • Eat with a fork and a spoon
  • Put together three simple shapes in a puzzle
  • Run smoothly and easily
  • Follow simple directions like “bring the ball”
  • Use 20-30 words
  • Insist on doing things by self
  • Point and name a few pictures in books
  • Hold and drink from a cup
  • Stack 4 blocks or objects
  • Walk well alone pulling/carrying toys
  • Understand/respond to simple questions
  • Use more than 50 words
  • Put two words together like “more nice”
  • Eat with a fork and a spoon
  • Put together three simple shapes in a puzzle
  • Run smoothly and easily
  • Understand many descriptive words like hot/cold, big/little, high/low,
  • hard/soft
  • Use 3-5 word sentences
  • Match colors and shapes Dress and undress self
  • Stack ten blocks
  • Walk up/down stairs (foot over foot)

Social Emotional Milestones

  • Gaze at your face and look in the direction of you voice
  • Smile spontaneously
  • Recognize a familiar voice
  • Make cooing sounds when she is happy, contented and communicative
  • Be soothed when picked up and comforted (most of the time)
  • Express her emotions and needs through her cries and actions
  • Intentionally express his emotions
  • Recognize his primary caregivers
  • Make eye contact
  • Read facial and vocal expressions and learn what different forms of
  • interaction mean
  • Form an attachment with his primary caregivers
  • Begin to intentionally tell you what she wants
  • Begin to miss you when you are not around
  • Begin to seek comfort from you.
  • Show you her emotions
  • Begin to show affection towards you
  • Develop a sense of herself as a separate person with her own likes and
  • dislikes
  • Become more confident and have a greater sense of him
  • Begin to take ownership of objects belonging to him, such as toys.
  • Notice his peers
  • Express his emotions to you
  • Begin to learn about others’ feelings and the concept of empathy
  • Want to make her own choices and decisions about how she does things
  • Begin to develop a sense of imagination as she takes on different roles
  • and engages in pretend play
  • Have more words that she uses to express herself and to get what she wants
  • Parallel play starts with toddlers playing next to each other
  • Be actively forming friendships with his peers when given the chance
  • Use more language between these months
  • Begin to use words to express his feelings
  • Engage in more imaginative play
  • Become more aware of peers and will be increasingly sympathetic toward them when they are upset
  • Become more engaged in social play skills